GelEnz Engineering Expert Receives Prestigious International Award

Professor Eichhorn has recently received the Hayashi Jisuke Award 2017 from the Cellulose Society of Japan for his work on cellulosic materials. Professor Eichhorn is one of only four scientists worldwide (other winners being from Finland, Japan and South Korea) to receive the award this year, for his pioneering research into the mechanical properties and interfaces in natural and sustainable materials, particularly cellulose fibres and composites. The award was officially bestowed at a special ceremony in Fukuoka, Japan, in October 2017. Speaking after receiving the award, Professor Eichhorn said:

I am delighted to win this award. I would especially like to thank all my students, collaborators and research team both past and present for all their hard work – you don’t win awards on your own steam!”.

Professor Eichhorn, who originally trained as a physicist, works closely with engineers, biologists, physicists and chemists. In 2011, he took up a position at the University of Exeter as a Professor in Materials Science becoming the Head of Engineering at Exeter from 2014-2017. In September 2017, Professor Eichhorn took up his present position as a Chair in Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Bristol. His research focuses on the mechanical properties and interfaces in natural and sustainable materials, particularly cellulose fibres and composites. He is particularly interested in applying principles from biological structures in engineering applications – or biomimetics – for a variety of applications including gels, composites, smart packaging, energy storage and biofunctional materials. He is currently the divisional Chair of the Cellulose and Renewable Materials Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) – the world’s largest scientific society. Professor Eichhorn is the first UK-based Chair of the division since its inception in the 1920s. Additionally, he is both a Fellow of the Institute of Materials and the Royal Society of Chemistry, and is also a member of the Institute of Physics.

For further enquiries please contact julie.lewis-thompson@bristol.ac.uk